Lead Generation for the Bored Comfort Consultant, Part 6

Are you a comfort consultant looking for innovative ways to generate more leads? Well, if you haven't gotten enough ideas in Parts 1-5 of this series, here are four more.

Put Up Yard Signs

Does your company provide you with yard signs? If not, purchase your own. They’re worth the investment. Don’t use these signs to simply list the company name and logo. Give potential homeowners a reason to call you — make what's in it for the consumer the bold focus of your sign. For example:

Another John’s Heating Installation
Rooms Too Hot?
Too Cold?

Call John’s Heating
Ask For Bill
555-1212

Another John’s Heating Installation
See How Much
I Can Save You

Call John’s Heating
Ask For Bill
555-1212

Another John’s Heating Installation
I Can Help Your
Indoor Air Quality

Call John’s Heating
Ask For Bill
555-1212

In a previous article in this series, we discussed the value of creating your own personal brochure. In it, you spell out why someone should buy from you — not from your company, but from YOU. What sets you apart from other salespeople? What unique training, skills, certifications, awards, and other credentials do you offer?
Tell people all about yourself and your background in a brochure.

Describe your business philosophy. Include testimonials from past customers. Outline the steps you take in designing their system. Give them full contact information. Give people reasons to want to do business with you over and above any other salesperson.

Why mention this again now? Because if you spend a little extra, you can attach brochure boxes to your yard signs. In the brochure box, place your personal brochure, and company brochures. Make sure the brochures include your phone number.

If your company already does use yard signs, see if you can attach brochure boxes to the ones you use and/or hang a panel recommending people call you.

Put it the yard sign when you close the sale. Pick it up when you commission the job.

Start a Website

Once you’ve created a personal brochure, the next step is to create a www.yourname.com website. On the website, include the same type of information as your personal brochure. Include consumer information and links. Also create a community links page. Give prospects enough information to make it worth a their while to spend a little time on your site.

Don’t feel compelled to make this an overly slick, professional site. Make it like a brochure, a virtual flyer that reflects your personality. If you feel uncomfortable creating the site yourself, find a high school kid and pay him or her to teach you.

Once you create the site, make sure you include its address on your business cards, your brochure, and any other piece of literature you distribute.

Start a Blog

Web logs, or blogs, are simple websites that contain your commentary. There are a number of Internet blog communities with no programming knowledge required.

Start a blog on home improvement and comfort. Or start one on events in your community. You might find yourself developing a following that will surprise you. The more local you can make the blog, the better. You want to attract readers from your market, not somewhere a thousand miles distant.

Place Your Own Low-Cost Ads

When the company takes out an ad, the leads get distributed to all salespeople. When you take out an ad, the leads come to you.

Find small newsletters where you can take out inexpensive advertisements. Some of these may be little more than small classified ads. Advertise in church newsletters, neighborhood association newsletters, club newsletters, and so on. The more ways you find to get your name out there, the more people will recognize it and think of you when they think HVAC.

Matt Michel is president of the Service Roundtable (www.ServiceRoundtable.com), an organization dedicated to helping contractors prosper. Matt is also the publisher of Comanche Marketing, a free marketing e-zine. Subscriptions are available at www.ComancheMarketing.com. You can contact him directly at [email protected]. Or send your comments to Contracting Business at [email protected].
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